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Who is Davina Lyon​ – A little insight into me​.

Who is Davina Lyon​ – A little insight into me​.
I am first & foremost a family person,​ a mother, ​a ​Grandmother, ​and​ a mother in law.
I love gardening and relaxing in the sun with my 2 dogs.
Iv got several tattoos, some were done before my Type 1 diabetes diagnosis and some after, and im not saying where they are lol.
I dye my hair myself always neglecting to dye a substantial amount of grey in my fringe area just over my right temple.
Iv earned my grey the hard way and im quite proud of that.
Im a big Harry Potter fan, and those who know me say im a bit of a witch.​ Next stop is Hogworts……
Im a firm believer that what you put out , you will recieve 3 fold and this has always proven to be the case for me.

After all​ that,

I am a person with Type 1 Diabetes who was diagnosed at a later stage in life just before my 50th Birthday.
Because of the trauma and crippling fear I had at diagnosis I did everything I could to learn as much as I could as fast as I could about Type 1 Diabetes, it’s causes, treatments, and the technology that could possibly make life just a little easier while living with this disease.
I’m not a shy, shrinking violet type of person, I’m more of a make noise and plenty of it kind of person when I believe passionately in a cause, issue, or injustice.
I do best when surrounded by people I can interact with and although some alone time is welcome, too much of it can make me lose my way a little. Basically I need a sense of purpose, without a purpose I ​tend to ​get a bit​ lost.
I can recover from being let down once, sometimes twice, after that it’s shutdown time and there will never be a third time. My confidence can be shaken easily.
Advocacy:
This came kinda naturally to me because of the kind of person I am but I think it’s really important to remain impartial, so I don’t personally benefit when interacting with companies about various diabetes related topics and technologies.
I think it’s important everyone understands that I also don’t benefit when advocating with a charity who may be sponsored or supported by a company.
In short​,​ nobody pays me and I don’t allow myself to be compromised.!
But I do want the information they provide to me.
Although I’m on a Medtronic 640G insulin pump and CGM combined, I still set up the Libre4All petition which amassed 19,003 signatures because i firmly believed the decision made to make it accessible ​only ​to children / teens​, reimbursed by the HSE​ but not adults, is age discrimination, then I went forward with the campaign with other advocates from our community​ to finalize and deliver it to our government, it was ​most definately ​a team effort.
I am very much a team player and would be the first to say there is no “I” in team. I always endeavor to give credit where it’s due and wouldn’t dream of taking credit for something I didn’t achieve alone. Integrity is a big thing for me.
The Ego:
If an advocate is advocating for ​personal ​credit or recognition then they are advocating for themselves and their status. ​Although this might inevitably get a result for people in our community, we must recognise that is was noise created to bring personal attention for status.​ Th​is is when advocacy​ i​s​ Ego driven.
I believe to be a​ true​ advocate, is to put forward a case on behalf of, or to support along side of others​, as a team​ fighting the good fight together.
I’m most comfortable ​advocating  as​ part of​ a team and if at the end of it all someone appreciates what was done and gives recognition to who achieved it then that’s a bonus, but I hold firmly in my mind that it’s not all about me, it’s about, and for, all of our diabetes community.

From time to time I get asked to try a new product so I can let others know about it in an informative way whether that’s positive or negative.

Other times i get a call to meet and interact with a company who supplies diabetes related stuff.
This week alone Iv had 2 of those phone calls and when I decide whether to accept or decline them I will let you all know about it and my reasons for my decision.
Iv Co Founded ​alongside​ John O Reilly​,
Diabetes T One Facebook page
Which is a private support group
just press join and an admin will admit you.

“My Mantra while living with Type 1 Diabetes is”

I’m Davina Lyon, I’m not a professional, just a person With Type 1 Diabetes sharing experience.

*IMPORTANT INFORMATION*
For those who think diabetes is caused by an unhealthy lifestyle let me clarify a couple of things.

I have type 1 diabetes. It’s an autoimmune disease. Nothing I did, or didn’t do caused it and nothing I do will cure it. There’s is currently no cure for Type 1 diabetes.

Type 1 Diabetes happens because our own antibodies attack and destroy an organ in the body. it’s an autoimmune response where antibodies that normally fight disease mistake a part of our body
(the pancreas in this case) as foreign and attack to destroy it.
When those antibodies attack the insulin-producing islets in the pancreas we stop producing insulin so we need to inject or pump it.

Without insulin a person with type 1 diabetes would die. At present it is not known what causes this to happen, and there is no cure.
A person with Type 1 diabetes MUST inject or pump insulin to stay alive.

There are many factors that contribute to a diagnosis of Type 2 diabetes so pre judgment of a lifestyle choice is unfair at very least.
A person with Type 2 diabetes, while still producing their own insulin for various reasons their body cannot use it correctly or efficiently.
These people are generally treated with oral medications and sometimes with insulin injections.

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Catching up with Diabetes fashion, – Wearing it on the arm ….. “sure it’s a thing now”

Since starting on my insulin pump (the Medtronic 640g) a year and a half ago Iv wore it in many ways, hanging on my bra, on my waistband and when showing off was needed I’d pop it on my pocket where it was clearly visible.

( sure that’s the “in” thing now ).

 

The sensor and infusion set was a bit different though and always ended up on my tummy.

I must admit to feeling a little envious of those with the Libre flash glucose meter on the back of the arm and clearly visible when worn with short sleeves.

The enlite sensor is recommended for the tummy but what the hell I thought I’d get with the diabetes fashion and see how it performed on my arm, all visible like the rest of my diabetes colleagues.

Now usually there is a little difference between the readings of a finger prick and the readings from a cgm (continuous glucose meter) This is because the finger prick is testing blood and the cgm is testing Interstitial fluid, or ISF. Glucose hits the bloodstream first and the ISF after that ( hence the delay and difference in results )

However since Sunday when I placed my new sensor on my arm the difference in readings had been reduced. Since Sunday my results are either the same on cgm and finger prick or they are 0.1 in the difference.

Sorry, I never tried this before but delighted to discover now that wearing my sensor on my arm gives a very nearly mirror image of my blood tests by finger prick.

I’ll wear my sensor on my arm from now on.

I’m Davina Lyon, I’m not a professional, just a person With Type 1 Diabetes sharing experience.

*IMPORTANT INFORMATION*
For those who think diabetes is caused by an unhealthy lifestyle let me clarify a couple of things.

I have type 1 diabetes. It’s an autoimmune disease. Nothing I did, or didn’t do caused it and nothing I do will cure it. There’s is currently no cure for Type 1 diabetes.

Type 1 Diabetes happens because our own antibodies attack and destroy an organ in the body. it’s an autoimmune response where antibodies that normally fight disease mistake a part of our body
(the pancreas in this case) as foreign and attack to destroy it.
When those antibodies attack the insulin-producing islets in the pancreas we stop producing insulin so we need to inject or pump it.

Without insulin a person with type 1 diabetes would die. At present it is not known what causes this to happen, and there is no cure.
A person with Type 1 diabetes MUST inject or pump insulin to stay alive.

There are many factors that contribute to a diagnosis of Type 2 diabetes so pre judgment of a lifestyle choice is unfair at very least.
A person with Type 2 diabetes, while still producing their own insulin for various reasons their body cannot use it correctly or efficiently.
These people are generally treated with oral medications and sometimes with insulin injections.

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Rising From The Ashes, with #Type1 #Diabetes

I wrote this for a friend who was only newly diagnosed with type 1 diabetes and she was struggling.

 

When she explained to me how she was feeling it brought me right back to when I was first diagnosed. I wanted her to see that she wasn’t alone and that I did understand.

Rising From The Ashes, with #Type1 #Diabetes

 

There have been many times in life when iv had to rise from the ashes, and each time iv done it, it’s always been with a sense of where iv been and where I’m going. Each time I rose in the past, iv had a network of friends and family behind me that I was somewhat sure of.

 

Upon my Type1 diagnosis, in the ashes is where I honestly ended up, this was one fall I’d never experienced before, and I knew beyond a shadow of a doubt that rising this time, would be one of the most difficult tasks I’d ever taken on.

 

Yes, learning the regime and lifestyle I now had follow was going to be challenging, but that was just maths. Counting carbs, working with ratios I’d been given, following sick day rules, being constantly watchful all day and all night, clock watching, always travelling with food, insulin pens, BG meter, test strips, a hypo kit and other hypo fix before things get too bad. Always thinking of food and when your next meal or snack is. Planing every detail of my day in order to remain stable. Its not in any way easy, but it’s do-able.

All this information initially comes from our diabetes team, in what ever hospital we are attending.

 

What they don’t tell you about:

From the first day of using insulin, newly diagnosed, and now at home ‘flying solo” the absolute crippling fear that sits firmly in the very front of your mind every single moment of every single day. “The fear of having a hypo” we know what can happen, we know what to be aware of, and yes we are told what to do.

Then bedtime comes………

Have you ever been terrified to close your eyes, in case you don’t Wake ?

Well that’s our first hurdle, it’s about then, we, “in our logical thinking” feed our diabetes. We automatically think first and foremost as a matter of priority about waking up, that’s all, just wanting to open our eyes to start another day.

At first we think going to bed high, is going to achieve this. It’s only later we learn that this practice is just as dangerous as being too low.

It’s that balance we need, I call it “walking the wire”

 

The isolation:

This feeling comes with the judgemental glances, the comments, the disapproving noises and gasps. The O My God are you really going to test in public? The, seriously are you going to inject in a restaurant? The noises of intolerance people make as you assess the food in front of you in order to work out your dose.

Yes, they would be happier if you took yourself off to the public toilet, full of germs and bacteria to inject like an addict, just so they can be comfortable.

The isolation happens, when we decide to hibernate and shield ourselves from this kind of behaviour, or worse again do what they require we do, and do it somewhere else.

The insult added to this, is they are usually the very same people who find us, in a dark and lonley place, crying constantly. That’s when they swoop in and say “you know depression and diabetes is quite common” they might even offer to drive you to the GP to talk about depression, but they never helped when pushing you into that corner.

This is something, that only someone diagnosed, or a carer of someone diagnosed, with type 1 diabetes will understand.

 

The blissfull ignorance & hurt:

This is when you make a decision one day, to help your friends etc to understand. Your all prepared for the conversation, when the opportunity arises. Your going to explain in simplistic terms, your going to educate gently. If we are totally honest we are not doing this to help them, we are doing it to help ourselves to fit back in to a place we once belonged.

You seize your your opportunity, and quickly realise there’s a lack of interest, you feel sad and defeated. Lost and lonely.

Iv spoken to many people who have gone though this, and yes their friendships have changed.

They feel more comfortable among those who speak the same language and live the same type of lifestyle. This way there is no need for explaining, and no need for justifying why we do the things we do.

 

This is why our online community is of so much importance, & Facebook is invaluable, we talk and exchange ideas and experiences, we may not have met face to face, but we are friends, because these people understand, learn, tell us about everything, and we don’t feel isolated or judged. These people put out their hand and help us up out of the darkness and isolation, until we can someday stand alone and help another going through the same thing.

 

Why am I posting this now ? Because if this is how you are feeling then I’m hoping you see that you too can be that Phoenix rising out of the ashes……..

 

 

 

Im Davina Lyon, I’m not a professional, just a person With Type 1 Diabetes sharing experience.

*IMPORTANT INFORMATION*
For those who think diabetes is caused by an unhealthy lifestyle let me clarify a couple of things.

I have type 1 diabetes. It’s an autoimmune disease. Nothing I did, or didn’t do caused it and nothing I do will cure it. There’s is currently no cure for Type 1 diabetes.

Type 1 Diabetes happens because our own antibodies attack and destroy an organ in the body. it’s an autoimmune response where antibodies that normally fight disease mistake a part of our body
(the pancreas in this case) as foreign and attack to destroy it.
When those antibodies attack the insulin producing islets in the pancreas we stop producing insulin so we need to inject or pump it.

Without insulin a person with type 1 diabetes would die. At present it is not known what causes this to happen, and there is no cure.
A person with Type 1 diabetes MUST inject or pump insulin to stay alive.

There are many factors that contribute to a diagnosis of Type 2 diabetes so pre judgment of a lifestyle choice is unfair at very least.
A person with Type 2 diabetes, while still producing their own insulin for various reasons their body cannot use it correctly or efficiently.
These people are generally treated with oral medications and sometimes with insulin injections.

 

 

Please support me to help raise funds for Diabetes Ireland.

Diabetes Ireland have been a huge support to me and our Type 1 Community.

Diabetes Ireland Fundraising link :

 

https://www.diabetes.ie/fundraising/donate/

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Getting High with Coffee and #Type1Diabetes

 

 

Getting High with Coffee and #Type1Diabetes

Back in the early days of living with Type 1 i was always baffled by the fact that when I woke my blood glucose would be 5-6 but an hour after my morning cup of coffee my blood glucose would have risen to anything between 10 and 13 and that’s without food.

My morning coffee is like my “On” switch and without it very little happens. It’s my function button, fuel for my daily journey.

Once I realised my dilemma and pinpointing what was happening I made some adjustments to my diabetes management. Now if your thinking I gave up coffee you’d be sadly mistaken, that would have resulted in either becoming a hermit or becoming people intolerant when I’m out.

My trick, and it works for ME ! While the kettle is boiling or the coffee pot is doing its thing, I bolus (inject with novo rapid) so it’s starting to kick in when I’m drinking my very necessary morning cuppa, with no after spike …

But let me remind you here everyone is different so speak to your diabetes health care professional about what YOU should do

But why does coffee cause a blood glucose spike?

One theory put to me was that coffee blocks insulin. The majority of articles Iv read state that Type 1 diabetics should avoid caffeine as it makes insulin less responsive, causing sugars to rise.

Another theory as to why it raises Blood Glucose is that the Caffeine causes an instant Adrenal response, this is one of the glands in the body which is responsible for the “flight or Fight” response. So when we drink coffee a hormone called Cortisol an Adrenalin is released into the blood stream which will have a slight blocking effect on circulating insulin take up. Also Cortisol and adrenalin and other fight of flight hormones released by the Adrenal glands will have a short term sudden impact on raising Blood Glucose, this is the main reason for a raise in Blood Sugar.

In not a professional just a coffee drinking person with type 1 diabetes

Davina

 

Im Davina Lyon, I’m not a professional, just a person With Type 1 Diabetes sharing experience.

*IMPORTANT INFORMATION*
For those who think diabetes is caused by an unhealthy lifestyle let me clarify a couple of things.

I have type 1 diabetes. It’s an autoimmune disease. Nothing I did, or didn’t do caused it and nothing I do will cure it. There’s is currently no cure for Type 1 diabetes.

Type 1 Diabetes happens because our own antibodies attack and destroy an organ in the body. it’s an autoimmune response where antibodies that normally fight disease mistake a part of our body
(the pancreas in this case) as foreign and attack to destroy it.
When those antibodies attack the insulin producing islets in the pancreas we stop producing insulin so we need to inject or pump it.

Without insulin a person with type 1 diabetes would die. At present it is not known what causes this to happen, and there is no cure.
A person with Type 1 diabetes MUST inject or pump insulin to stay alive.

There are many factors that contribute to a diagnosis of Type 2 diabetes so pre judgment of a lifestyle choice is unfair at very least.
A person with Type 2 diabetes, while still producing their own insulin for various reasons their body cannot use it correctly or efficiently.
These people are generally treated with oral medications and sometimes with insulin injections.

Please support me to help raise funds for
Thriveabetes or Diabetes Ireland

Please support me to help raise funds for
Thriveabetes or Diabetes Ireland.

If you would like to make a donation to Thriveabetes – we appreciate every single donation.Thriveabetes is completely organised by volunteers. The financial cost of Thriveabetes is subsidized through fundraising, event ticket sales, sponsorship and an adjoining exhibition.

http://thriveabetes.ie/index.php/donate-2/

Diabetes Ireland have been a huge support to me and our Type 1 Community.

Diabetes Ireland Fundraising link :

https://www.diabetes.ie/fundraising/donate/

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What Happens When We Just Cant “Do” Diabetes Anymore ?

 

What Happens When We Just Cant “Do” Diabetes Anymore ?

I’m writing this for those who think blood glucose in double figures is alright.
I’m writing this for those who think the complications of regular high blood glucose won’t affect them.
I’m writing this for those who don’t comply with their treatment, those who think living dangerously won’t have consequences in the future.

 

We get diagnosed, we deal with the shock and trauma of the diagnosis, we are enrolled in diabetes education, introduced to insulin and other medications, we deal with information overload and then if we are wise we do whatever we can to hook up and meet or chat online with others just like ourselves.

After crying many tears i started the journey of managing my type 1 diabetes, YES, i said manage and not control.
Im a firm believer that i never control my type 1 as there are so many  things in my daily life that influence my blood glucose like stress, worry, hot weather, cold weather, being ill, exercise, and general daily exertion to name but a few.
I was taught how to MANAGE the ever fluctuation highs and lows of my type 1 diabetes, and do what ever i could to keep my blood glucose numbers within the recommended range.

But…… what happens when we just cant “Do” diabetes anymore ?

I get tired of the constant daily work, “yes work” thats involved in the management of type 1 diabetes. I want to eat like everyone else and not have to inject or pump insulin to cover that food or drink.

Personally from the day i was diagnosed my feeling was that “food was the problem” i couldnt just eat it and get on with what i had to do.
I clearly remember back in the early days of diagnosis, putting my lunch on the table and the Novo rapid pen beside it, all ready to inject and eat.
I looked at that picture for a very long time ( maybe an hour and a half ) threw my lunch in the bin and then put away the insulin pen.
Sorted, i thought !

However nothing was sorted because even without food blood glucose can rise for many reasons, sure isnt that why we take Lantus as well and novo rapid.

Lantus is our basel ( background ) insulin, the stuff that keeps us balanced between meals.

Novo rapid ( fast acting insulin ) doesn’t just cover and help process the carbs I eat, it also brings down and corrects my blood glucose if it’s high because of illness or the many other things that rise it daily.

I wasnt long about copping on though because ketones then became an issue, not to mention the fact that i got extremely hungry.

I often hear people say they dont want to hear the scary stuff, you know, the stuff about what happens if we dont keep the blood glucose numbers within the recommended range at least most of the time, if we just dont play by the rules.

Question for you …..
when someone learns to drive a car on the road, should they be made aware of the scary stuff, you know like “speed kills” “never drink and drive” “dont use your mobile phone while driving” ? of course they should because that should make them more cautious and aware of the dangers of not following the rules.

NOW !
Why on earth are newly diagnosed people not made painfully aware on the day of diagnosis, of the dangers of not managing their diabetes?

Sight problems, healing problems, heart problems, stroke, dental problems, infections, kidney failure, diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA), Coma and death, etc.

I get really fed up and so tired of it all, my pump alarm waking me and my family during the night, the alarm when i go for a walk or even just hoover the house and it saying im going low.
The pump alarm repeating “high alert” after iv eaten chinese takeaway even though iv bolused correctly.

I often feel my pump is so unforgiving and judgmental, i feel like pulling it off sometimes and smashing it against a wall or f -c-ing it out a window, and then just eat what i want and not inject insulin, but what would i gain from that ?

Yes its true, i could swop my insulin pump or insulin pen for dialysis, blindness, a prosthetic leg or two and awfull shoes on them.

I could swop my insulin for a cardiac problem that wouldnt allow me to even walk to the other side of a room.

I could have a stroke and be paralised, never ever again having independance.

I could go into a coma and not be the same person waking up, if i woke up that is.

Death ? doesnt actually worry me because i wouldnt be here anymore, its the thought of ending up with no quality of life and no independance that keeps me on the straight and narrow, most of the time.

Now before anybody starts to tell me that this simply does not happen, let me tell you it does and i know these people.

Its when i take a few moments to calm down and think of the consequences of my actions that i reluctantly fall back in line and dutifully count my carbs and inject or pump my insulin.

I want quality of life to do the things that i enjoy the most.
Its ok to rebel a little, but talk to someone who understands what your feeling and then get back on track.

Stupidity is not an attractive trait …….
Manage your diabetes correctly

 

 

 

Im Davina Lyon, I’m not a professional, just a person With Type 1 Diabetes sharing experience.

 

 

*IMPORTANT INFORMATION*
For those who think diabetes is caused by an unhealthy lifestyle let me clarify a couple of things.

I have type 1 diabetes. It’s an autoimmune disease. Nothing I did, or didn’t do caused it and nothing I do will cure it. There’s is currently no cure for Type 1 diabetes.

Type 1 Diabetes happens because our own antibodies attack and destroy an organ in the body. it’s an autoimmune response where antibodies that normally fight disease mistake a part of our body (the pancreas in this case) as foreign and attack to destroy it.
When those antibodies attack the insulin producing islets in the pancreas we stop producing insulin so we need to inject or pump it.

Without insulin a person with type 1 diabetes would die. At present it is not known what causes this to happen, and there is no cure.
A person with Type 1 diabetes MUST inject or pump insulin to stay alive.

There are many factors that contribute to a diagnosis of Type 2 diabetes so pre judgment of a lifestyle choice is unfair at very least.
A person with Type 2 diabetes, while still producing their own insulin for various reasons their body cannot use it correctly or efficiently.
These people are generally treated with oral medications and sometimes with insulin injections.

Please support me to help raise funds for
Thriveabetes or Diabetes Ireland

Please support me to help raise funds for
Thriveabetes or Diabetes Ireland.

If you would like to make a donation to Thriveabetes – we appreciate every single donation.Thriveabetes is completely organised by volunteers. The financial cost of Thriveabetes is subsidized through fundraising, event ticket sales, sponsorship and an adjoining exhibition.

http://thriveabetes.ie/index.php/donate-2/

Diabetes Ireland have been a huge support to me and our Type 1 Community.

Diabetes Ireland Fundraising link :

https://www.diabetes.ie/fundraising/donate/

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Every now and then, there’s a “Light Bulb Moment” That moment when everything looks a little clearer …….

Every now and then, there’s a “Light Bulb Moment” 
That moment when everything looks a little clearer …….
 

My first lightbulb moment after being diagnosed with type 1 diabetes was finding myself at a DAFNE course with others just like myself. Living with type 1 diabetes.
It felt a little like being adopted into a club of like minded people. People I could communicate with and we all knew exactly what we were talking about, “daily life with type 1 diabetes”
 
It made me feel accepted, understood, and then by the end of the week, educated…..
 
My second lightbulb moment was when I attended my first conference for people with type 1 diabetes. That was Thriveabetes 2015. I had no idea what to expect but the idea of being among so many people with type 1 always feels like a comfort.
 
There were so many people I knew online and chatted to regularly, I could see their profile pictures so it all felt familiar but meeting them in person was brilliant.
 
Those who arrived the night before met up for drinks in the lounge and chatted and laughed getting to know each other. That’s when I first saw the Medtronic 640G integrated insulin pump. ” funny the things we chat about over drinks”.
 
The next morning I arrived early for breakfast where I got chatting to a Medtronic rep as luck would have it.
 
As people arrived I felt excited as I got to meet them in person and watching the event fall into place there was a feeling of relief that everything was going to the plan Grainne had set out in her vision.
 
Joe Solowiejczyk diabetes educator and person with type 1 diabetes, http://www.parentingdiabetickids.com/ask-our-team/meet-our-team/joe-solowiejczyk/
who was one of the Speakers talked about personally living with T1 and told that story in such a humorous way.
 
Other speakers covered, education, statistics, what we should be aiming for and how best to achieve it, latest on research and latest technology.
 
There ware separate groups for adults living with type 1 and parents of children with type 1. Among the renowned speakers we had a representative from JDRF, and Dr Kevin Moore, Consultant Endo from Naas and Tallaght Hospital diabetes clinics.
 
At lunch I saw a pebble watch with nightscout, something I’d never heard of before and there it was right in front of me, absolutely fascinating, and I was told where I could get more information about it.
 
It was a day full of fact from professionals and information from other people with type 1 diabetes about useful groups and where to find the very latest info, a day full of learning, education and making friends.
 
I arrived, and attended as a part of my T1 community, I left at the end of the day fully motivated and feeling like nothing was beyond me.
 
That day I became a diabetes advocate ….
 
This year I’m really looking forward to meeting up with everyone again, some new people, some Iv met last year, and some who have become treasured colleagues, friends and role models.
 
 
Davina
Im Davina Lyon, I’m not a professional, just a person With Type 1 Diabetes sharing experience.

 

*IMPORTANT INFORMATION*
For those who think diabetes is caused by an unhealthy lifestyle let me clarify a couple of things.

I have type 1 diabetes. It’s an autoimmune disease. Nothing I did, or didn’t do caused it and nothing I do will cure it. There’s is currently no cure for Type 1 diabetes.

 

Type 1 Diabetes happens because our own antibodies attack and destroy an organ in the body. it’s an autoimmune response where antibodies that normally fight disease mistake a part of our body
(the pancreas in this case) as foreign and attack to destroy it.
When those antibodies attack the insulin producing islets in the pancreas we stop producing insulin so we need to inject or pump it.

Without insulin a person with type 1 diabetes would die. At present it is not known what causes this to happen, and there is no cure.
A person with Type 1 diabetes MUST inject or pump insulin to stay alive.

There are many factors that contribute to a diagnosis of Type 2 diabetes so pre judgment of a lifestyle choice is unfair at very least.
A person with Type 2 diabetes, while still producing their own insulin for various reasons their body cannot use it correctly or efficiently.
These people are generally treated with oral medications and sometimes with insulin injections.

Please support me to help raise funds for
Thriveabetes or Diabetes Ireland

 

Please support me to help raise funds for
Thriveabetes or Diabetes Ireland.

If you would like to make a donation to Thriveabetes – we appreciate every single donation.Thriveabetes is completely organised by volunteers. The financial cost of Thriveabetes is subsidized through fundraising, event ticket sales, sponsorship and an adjoining exhibition.

http://thriveabetes.ie/index.php/donate-2/

Diabetes Ireland have been a huge support to me and our Type 1 Community.

Diabetes Ireland Fundraising link :

https://www.diabetes.ie/fundraising/donate/

, ,

Bedtime and That Horror Moment of Injecting NovoRapid instead of Lantus

Bedtime and That Horror Moment of Injecting NovoRapid instead of Lantus

Picture this. I’m in the dressing gown having a neighbour hood watch conversation with my daughter after a meeting we attended. Winding down and heading for the duvet, just had to take my 22 units of Lantus.

Dialled up the 22 units and injected, that’s when I realised I’d just injected 22 units of Novo Rapid at 11.30 at night. Il Never forget the initial panic, even with my biggest meal followed by desert Iv never needed 22 units.
Holy shit is what I said, my daughter on the other hand had more choice language. On top of this it’s the night before a big food shop so the house wasn’t exactly loaded up with goodies.

A bottle 1/2 full of flat coke was plonked in front of me. Drink it she ordered as she got into the car fully dressed for bed and headed to the nearest shop, she ran around grabbing bread rolls, jelly sweets, cake, and basically full sugar anything like a mad woman hell bent on a midnight feast with a deadline. 

 
No ! 110 gms of carbs as pure glucose wasn’t an option, the last thing needed here was a huge big fast high, I needed stability, some fast acting along with some slow release carbs. “Steady as she goes”

Once the horror of what I’d just done subsided, I started to calculate just how much I’d have to eat to cover it. My insulin to carb ratio was 5/1 that’s 1 unit of rapid to every 5 gms of carbs eaten.
Now in reverse 22 units of novo rapid using a 5/1 ratio, that’s 22 ✖️ 5 = a massive 110gms of carbs for supper right before bedtime. ( chocolate is not advised for treating low blood sugar because it’s got a high fat content. The fat content slows down the release of glucose into the blood stream, but hours after eating it you have a delayed blood sugar spike with no insulin on board to deal with it ) and so it becomes correction time.

With paper and pen at the ready and trying to keep the sheer panic at bay, I wrote down all the carbs I was now eating and drinking until it added up to that magic number (110) by the time I’d finished eating i had a tummy pain and just wanted to be sick.

That’s not where it ends though, the novo rapid would be active in my system for about 2 and 1/2 hours that’s 2am. So going to bed even after scoffing all that still wouldn’t be safe even if I could lie down with all that just sitting in there.

At 2am that morning my Blood Glucose was 4.5 I had to eat even more. 2 rice cakes and a coffee. I was in bed just before 3am and I did not feel at all well.

Note to self, concentrate when I’m about to inject at any time. This is one of those mistakes I will only make once ……….

 
Davina.
Im Davina Lyon, I’m not a professional, just a person With Type 1 Diabetes sharing experience.

*IMPORTANT INFORMATION*
For those who think diabetes is caused by an unhealthy lifestyle let me clarify a couple of things.

I have type 1 diabetes. It’s an autoimmune disease. Nothing I did, or didn’t do caused it and nothing I do will cure it. There’s is currently no cure for Type 1 diabetes.

 

 

Type 1 Diabetes happens because our own antibodies attack and destroy an organ in the body. it’s an autoimmune response where antibodies that normally fight disease mistake a part of our body
(the pancreas in this case) as foreign and attack to destroy it.
When those antibodies attack the insulin producing islets in the pancreas we stop producing insulin so we need to inject or pump it.

Without insulin a person with type 1 diabetes would die. At present it is not known what causes this to happen, and there is no cure.
A person with Type 1 diabetes MUST inject or pump insulin to stay alive.

There are many factors that contribute to a diagnosis of Type 2 diabetes so pre judgment of a lifestyle choice is unfair at very least.
A person with Type 2 diabetes, while still producing their own insulin for various reasons their body cannot use it correctly or efficiently.
These people are generally treated with oral medications and sometimes with insulin injections.

Please support me to help raise funds for
Thriveabetes or Diabetes Ireland

 

Please support me to help raise funds for
Thriveabetes or Diabetes Ireland.

If you would like to make a donation to Thriveabetes – we appreciate every single donation.Thriveabetes is completely organised by volunteers. The financial cost of Thriveabetes is subsidized through fundraising, event ticket sales, sponsorship and an adjoining exhibition.

http://thriveabetes.ie/index.php/donate-2/

Diabetes Ireland have been a huge support to me and our Type 1 Community.

Diabetes Ireland Fundraising link :

https://www.diabetes.ie/fundraising/donate/


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“Drunk without the Alcohol” by a #T1D

#DiabetesBlog #Hypoglycemia #DeGlucofied How does it feel ?

“Drunk without the Alcohol” by a #T1D

Sugar is not the cause of #Diabetes. Without sugar people with diabetes would be in serious trouble. #Sugar is treatment for #Hypoglycemia #Hypos, People with #Type1Diabetes and some people with #Type2Diabetes need sugar just like they need #Insulin to survive. Sugar to a #Diabetic is just as needed and just as important as our insulin is.

De-glucofied ( my new word ) “What happens in the hypo stays in the hypo”

Whenever I meet parents of children, not long diagnosed with type 1 diabetes, especially parents of young children one of the first questions they ask is, “what does a hypo or a low blood sugar feel like” of course they read the symptoms, but what it actually feels like is a whole other thing.

Sometimes children don’t seem to have listened to what’s been said to them, sometimes they just sleep for hours after a low, maybe have a tummy pain or upset tummy, they might be weepy, or feel a bit emotionally soft, seem confused, seem awkward, uncordidated or can’t remember. Well this is how I feel during a low, after a low, and sometimes for quite a while afterwards.

I woke up during one nights sleep and I knew straight away this wasn’t good, I actually felt confused making my way to the kitchen and tried to maintain my balance while keeping the wall real close.
Because I was more than a tad disorientated when I got to my meter I spilled the tub of test strips on the floor and they seemed to have taken flight. There’s a visible flush going on, with a trickle of sweat running from my hairline, my clothes feel damp, o wait they are damp with sweat, and I know that someone is talking to me because their lips are moving, but Iv no idea what they’re saying. I treated that low heavily, my reading was 2.3 and I slept deeply for hours after it.

Nobody can understand that “no mans land” that I am in when my blood sugar is low, except another person with diabetes who’s had a low or hypo.
Totally deglucofied, and because of that, strangely unresponsive, and when I say unresponsive I don’t mean unconscious.
One moment I am walking around, chatting and laughing, thinking things through, planning, working, or just cooking the dinner, when i slip silently into, not thinking and just doing.
I go from walking with purpose and direction to walking and not knowing why or where Im going.
I go from chatting and laughing to seeing people around me chatting, i hear sounds but they don’t make sense, it’s like quite noise and my brain can’t figure out where it’s coming from. Afterwards when iv treated the low BG with glucose or sugar of some sort, I find people saying “remember I told you that” ? Mmm NO. Because “what happens in the hypo stays in the hypo” and does not get remembered.

For all the following reasons hypos or lows can be very frightening and bit dangerous.
It would be easy to fall and hurt myself.
It would be easy to say or do something and have no recollection of it afterwards.
It’s easy to put something down and not be able to find it.
It’s easy to eat for survival and not measure, count or care about portion size or carb count.
It would be easy to walk out in front of a car when crossing a road, because judgment is gone.
if im walking there’s a strange but not nice feeling of walking on air, like the ground beneath my feet just doesn’t exist, impact as I walk is gone, tripping and falling would be so easy

Because all of these things are completely out of our control when our blood sugar drops too low and that’s just one side of the coin.

The treatment (not treat ) is sugar / glucose in the form of a full sugar drink or lucozade, jelly beans, jelly babies, skittles, basically anything high in sugar or glucose.

It’s important to remember that when you treat a headache, a hangover, or something else that’s making you feel rotten, you don’t just pop a pill and feel instantly better, the same applies to popping in the glucose for a hypo, it’s not an instant “feel better” it takes time to come back to normal.

Treating a hypo in no different, yes we treat it, and get those blood sugar numbers back within range, but the “feel good” feeling dosent return instantly because there’s an aftermath. The fact that you’v dropped low means it’s effected all of your body and it takes quite a while for the sugar rush to reach everywhere and get us back on track.
If your anything like me all of this is followed with a dreadfull headache, an upset tummy, and a feeling of exhaustion that leaves me fit for nothing but sleep.

It’s actually worse than being very drunk, it’s downright frightening.
My Balance, sight, & sense of direction are all effected,

Davina.

 

 

Im Davina Lyon, I’m not a professional, just a person With Type 1 Diabetes sharing experience.

 

 

*IMPORTANT INFORMATION*
For those who think diabetes is caused by an unhealthy lifestyle let me clarify a couple of things.

I have type 1 diabetes. It’s an autoimmune disease. Nothing I did, or didn’t do caused it and nothing I do will cure it. There’s is currently no cure for Type 1 diabetes.

 

Type 1 Diabetes happens because our own antibodies attack and destroy an organ in the body. it’s an autoimmune response where antibodies that normally fight disease mistake a part of our both (the pancreas in this case) as foreign and attack to destroy it.

When those antibodies attack the insulin producing islets in the pancreas we stop producing insulin so we need to inject or pump it.

Without insulin a person with type 1 diabetes would die. At present it is not known what causes this to happen, and there is no cure.
A person with Type 1 diabetes MUST inject or pump insulin to stay alive.

There are many factors that contribute to a diagnosis of Type 2 diabetes so pre judgment of a lifestyle choice is unfair at very least.
A person with Type 2 diabetes, while still producing their own insulin for various reasons their body cannot use it correctly or efficiently.
These people are generally treated with oral medications and sometimes with insulin injections.

Please support me to help raise funds for
Thriveabetes or Diabetes Ireland

Please support me to help raise funds for
Thriveabetes or Diabetes Ireland.

If you would like to make a donation to Thriveabetes – we appreciate every single donation.Thriveabetes is completely organised by volunteers. The financial cost of Thriveabetes is subsidized through fundraising, event ticket sales, sponsorship and an adjoining exhibition.

http://thriveabetes.ie/index.php/donate-2/

Diabetes Ireland have been a huge support to me and our Type 1 Community.

Diabetes Ireland Fundraising link :

https://www.diabetes.ie/fundraising/donate/

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Diabetes Community Demand Access 4 All, to new life-changing flash glucose technology


  1. EMBARGEOD until WEDNESDAY 18TH APRIL 2018 at 12 noon

Equality 4 All petition printed and ready for presentation (credit to Grainne )

Diabetes Community demand access for all to new life-changing flash glucose technology

Petition signed by 19,000 people presented to TD’s

 

A petition presentation to TDs seeking to make the new flash glucose monitoring technology, the Freestyle Libre, available to all people with Type 1 diabetes, based on clinical need will take place on Wednesday 18th April 2018, at the gates of Leinster House (Kildare Street) at 11:30am. The petition, signed by more than 18,000 people, calls on the HSE to remove the age barrier criteria it has set and give access to this life changing technology to those who clinically need it most.

From 3 April 2018, the HSE has made the Freestyle Libre available only to children and young adults with Type 1 diabetes aged between 4 and 21 years. ​

Gráinne Flynn, one of the campaign leaders stated “The Freestyle Libre provides more information than a finger prick meter about glucose levels to base our insulin dosing decisions on. This is more than just a game changer in diabetes, it empowers us to manage our diabetes better, reducing the number of dangerous low and high glucose levels. What frustrates me so much is that the HSE seems to have based its decision not on clinical evidence of improved quality of life but on cost saving reasons, indicating that, anyone with type 1 diabetes over age 21 is not worth investing €62.60 per year.”

All other countries who have reimbursed the Freestyle Libre system have made this life changing technology available to people with diabetes based on clinical need. Ireland is the only country who has placed an overarching restriction of age for 4 – 21 years and within this age group there are further restrictions for this cohort to access this technology

Donal Gilroy, a self-employed Energy Assessor from Sligo has been living with type 1 diabetes for 35 years, said: “I didn’t realise that I was having dangerous low blood glucose levels every night at about 3am until I started using the Libre. I rarely woke during these and my long-term health was affected. Once we discovered them myself and my consultant had a fuller picture of how my diabetes was being managed and we were able to address and eliminate the problems. I feel my health has improved significantly since using the Libre. Things, like not having to finger prick 8 times a day, not constantly having sore fingers has improved the quality of my day to day life.”

“All we are seeking, is the opportunity for our Consultant Endocrinologists to be able to make a decision based on clinical need to prescribe the Libre to patients they feel need it most, regardless of age. It’s not a lot to ask” added Grainne.

 

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My clean up begins by reducing the carbs

This time last year I was well on track with​ the​ ​control of ​my carb intake but then the home move started and as I was in temporary accommodation for 5 months I pretty much eat what ever was available with zero plan​n​ing.

October brought the final move to my new home but by then life had become all kinds of crazy so I kept eating pretty much what was available, handy and fast.

Christmas happened and nothing changed, then Easter …..
With all that chocolate.

​I know that some people dont know the importance of a daily carb intake but when you live with Type 1 Diabetes every gram of carbs you eat means a unit of insulin must be administered either through an injection or an insulin pump. ​After working out the carbs in that sandwitch or what ever im about to eat, i them must take into account what type of carb it is and how much fat is in it.

An example of this is a piece of friut Vs chocolate or something with a high fat content in it. Even if both have the same amount of carbs, they impact the blood at different rates.

The fruit carbs will quickly enter the blood and cause a very quick rise in blood glucose so il take the necessary amount of insulin just befor i eat it.

The chocolate will impact the blood at slower rate so depending on the type of fat content in foods i sometimes split the insulin dose i need for it, so if i needed 8 units for the chocolate i would take 4 units just before i eat it and then 4 more units an hour afterwards to prevent a blood glucose spike.

If i didnt do this and took the whole amount of insulin needed then long after the 4 hour period that the insulin remains in my system, the chocolate would still be rising my blood glucose.
The fat content in food slows the release of carbs into the blood so its important to administer my insulin so that it lasts as long in my system as is needed for the type of food iv eaten.

Living Life with ty[e 1 diabetes can ba a complicated business, and it certainly is work 24/7/365 but what i will say is it becomes your way of life, and although it remains a serious pain in the ass, doing everything we must do all day every day does become automatic.

YES I HEAR YOU ! we can eat what we want just like others, and …… yes we can, your right, BUT !

​Even though ​I manage​d​ my blood ​glucose​ every step of the way. I ​continously ​chased the high spikes with insulin and the lows with full sugar.

The result​ of all this was ​waking constantly through the night to a CGM alarm either showing that my blood sugar was way too high or way too low.

The weight gain​ that happened was inevitable both because of my food choices and my increased insulin needs. Insulin is a growth hormone, so it was gain by food and gain by insulin, and I do firmly believe this.

Easter Monday was day 1 of getting back on track. I unboxed the remaining Easter eggs and stashed them in my spare fridge in the laundry room. Out of sight is out of mind. That fridge gets used on​ly gets used on​ very rare occasions, like Christmas​ or when the weather people predict large amounts of snow, bringing on a panic buy.​

I​ have now ​done the “clean” and “lower carb” shop and ​i am ​well on track.

Day 1…..

By bedtime I remembered why this was a better way to manage my type 1, my CGM held a fairly steady even line all day and as it turned out, through the night too.
I slept all night straight through​ and​ undisturbed by a CGM alarm and was more than a little surprised that when I finally opened my eyes it was 9.30am​ that morning.​

I’m a chocolate addict so please don’t suggest “a square or 2 does no harm” I’m like an alcoholic when it comes to chocolate.

I’m only ever 1 square away from a feast. It’s either all or nothing.
So for now it’s​ got to be​ nothing.

Iv done this before and lost 3 stone relatively easily, dropped my HBA1C and felt amazing.
I guess I’m saying I’m very well experienced for this particular job.

 

My foods ?….
Well, rice​ will​ now become​ ​cauliflower rice
Pasta will be non existent
Chips – a thing if the past
Potato ? Well I learnt that mashed turnip is a good substitute.

Snacks –
chocolate rice cakes, “yes you read that right” the thinnest smear of chocolate Iv ever eaten but it satisfies a craving.

Fresh coconut, chopped and in the fridge ready for munching on.

Fruit and ​yoghurtI will also have daily, it feels sweet and bold but it’s easily managed if eaten whole.

The Paleo App is downloaded to my phone with lots of delicious recipe ideas that I can tweek to suit me.

Creamy sauces ? Made with coconut milk.

Breads ? Only if necessary but as I don’t eat it daily I don’t miss it.

Lots of eggs, fish, chicken, beef, and Ham.

Lots of vegetables and salads some of which I know have higher carbs than others so I’ll chose wisely

BUT ! It’s not chocolate, cakes, and the stuff that makes my blood sugar bounce off the walls while being chased by insulin, all of which leaves me feeling rotten and exhausted.

It’s not hard to stick to after the first few days.
Treat day is Friday, so that’s takeaway night if Iv been good the other 6 days.

I don’t suppose a walk daily would do me any harm !

I’ll actually be eating more and using less insulin. Instead of my CGM demanding attention, I hope to find myself wondering if it’s died because it’s so quiet.

And so it begins ……

Im Davina Lyon, I’m not a professional, just a person With Type 1 Diabetes sharing experience.

*IMPORTANT INFORMATION*
For those who think diabetes is caused by an unhealthy lifestyle let me clarify a couple of things.

I have type 1 diabetes. It’s an autoimmune disease. Nothing I did, or didn’t do caused it and nothing I do will cure it. There’s is currently no cure for Type 1 diabetes.

 

Type 1 Diabetes happens because our own antibodies attack and destroy an organ in the body. it’s an autoimmune response where antibodies that normally fight disease mistake a part of our body
(the pancreas in this case) as foreign and attack to destroy it.
When those antibodies attack the insulin producing islets in the pancreas we stop producing insulin so we need to inject or pump it.

Without insulin a person with type 1 diabetes would die. At present it is not known what causes this to happen, and there is no cure.
A person with Type 1 diabetes MUST inject or pump insulin to stay alive.

There are many factors that contribute to a diagnosis of Type 2 diabetes so pre judgment of a lifestyle choice is unfair at very least.
A person with Type 2 diabetes, while still producing their own insulin for various reasons their body cannot use it correctly or efficiently.
These people are generally treated with oral medications and sometimes with insulin injections.

Please support me to help raise funds for
Thriveabetes or Diabetes Ireland

 

Please support me to help raise funds for
Thriveabetes or Diabetes Ireland.

If you would like to make a donation to Thriveabetes – we appreciate every single donation.Thriveabetes is completely organised by volunteers. The financial cost of Thriveabetes is subsidized through fundraising, event ticket sales, sponsorship and an adjoining exhibition.

http://thriveabetes.ie/index.php/donate-2/

Diabetes Ireland have been a huge support to me and our Type 1 Community.

Diabetes Ireland Fundraising link :

https://www.diabetes.ie/fundraising/donate/