Let’s talk Hyperglycaemia and DKA or Diabetic Ketoacidosis, to give it its full title.. ………

 

Let’s talk Hyperglycaemia and DKA or Diabetic Ketoacidosis, to give it its full title.. ………

DKA happens when your blood glucose is too high, it can happen to someone who has diabetes but hasn’t been diagnosed.

It can happen when a person has type 1 diabetes and for whatever reason hasn’t enough insulin administered  because of a pump site that’s not working properly, or because they either haven’t injected when they have eaten, or they have administered insulin, but just not enough to cover the carbohydrate in the food they have eaten.

How does it feel ? it can feel like being drunk, in fact if you drive while like this and were tested with a breath test by the Garda on a road check, you’d be over the limit without ever having touched a drop.

Being ill, being stressed, exercise, hormones and a whole host of other things can also drive blood glucose high, this is when those of us with type 1 diabetes enforce our sick day plan to manage our ever climbing blood glucose, and try to prevent going into DKA.

INSULIN is the only thing that will manage our blood glucose and get us back within a safe range.

It’s also worth noting that medications we may be taking for an illness could also drive our blood glucose up; one of those medications is a steroid, yes even in a nasal spray.

UNTREATED HIGH BLOOD GLUCOSE IS VERY SERIOUS AND VERY DANGEROUS, NOT ONLY CAN IT CAUSE LASTING DAMAGE, IT CAN KILL YOU.

If you have diabetes and are experiencing this, but cannot manage to get your blood glucose back within range using your sick day plan, you should contact A&E if it’s outside working hours or if it’s during the day then phone your diabetes team or at least your GP, for be sure to seek medical help.

UNDIAGNOSED TYPE 1 DIABETES:

Now this worries me a lot, this is where a child or adult is unwell with flu like symptoms or maybe a tummy upset  but the symptoms are being put down to a bug of some kind, later things get worse and now maybe the person / child in unresponsive.

IT WOULD BE SO VERY EASY FOR A GP TO DO A SIMPLE FINGER PRICK WHILE HE HAS YOU IN HIS SURGURY BUT HE DOESNT. IT WOULD BE SO EASY FOR THE SICK PERSON OR THE PARENT OF THE CHILD WHO IS SICK TO “INSIST” A SIMPLE FINGER PRICK BLOOD TEST BE DONE BUT THEY DONT.

SECONDS IS ALL IT TAKES TO GET THE RESULTS AND SAVE A LIFE. UNFORTUNATELY THIS DOESNT ALWAYS HAPPEN, AND I FEEL IT’S BECAUSE TYPE 1 DIABETES DOESNT GET ENOUGH MEDIA COVERAGE, SO NOT MUCH AWARENESS. PEOPLE AND SOME GPs SIMPLE DONT KNOW TO CHECK FOR IT.

THE BASICS…….

The symptoms or the 4 Ts of undiagnosed diabetes are

  • Tired:  more tired than usual
  • Toilet: Needing to use the toilet more often to Pee
  • Thirst: a feeling of a thirst you just can’t quench so drinking more than usual
  • Thin: unexplained weight loss, no matter how much you eating
  • IF YOU HAVE ALL OR ANY OF THESE SYMPTOMS GO STRAIGHT TO YOUR GP AND INSIST ON A BLOOD GLUCOSE TEST AND DONT TAKE NO FOR AN ANSWER.

 

IMPORTANT FORMATION*

For those who think diabetes is caused by an unhealthy lifestyle let me clarify a couple of things.

I have type 1 diabetes. It’s an autoimmune disease. Nothing I did, or didn’t do caused it and nothing I do will cure it. There’s is currently no cure for Type 1 diabetes.

Type 1 Diabetes happens because our own antibodies attack and destroy an organ in the body. it’s an autoimmune response where antibodies that normally fight disease mistake a part of our body

(the pancreas in this case) as foreign and attack to destroy it.

When those antibodies attack the insulin-producing islets in the pancreas we stop producing insulin so we need to inject or pump it.

Without insulin a person with type 1 diabetes would die. At present it is not known what causes this to happen, and there is no cure.

A person with Type 1 diabetes MUST inject or pump insulin to stay alive.

There are many factors that contribute to a diagnosis of Type 2 diabetes so pre judgment of a lifestyle choice is unfair at very least.

A person with Type 2 diabetes, while still producing their own insulin for various reasons their body cannot use it correctly or efficiently.

These people are generally treated with oral medications and sometimes with insulin injections.

Davina Lyon

Co-Founder of Diabetes T One & A Diabetes Life

 

 

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